Places To Visit

What makes Cornwall different? How about the gorgeous scenery, the food and the sea – here are a few of our highly recommended local places to visit while you enjoy your stay with us.

Our local village of Pelynt is just 600 yards away, an easy stroll to the shop for the papers and the Jubilee Inn a lovely 16th Century pub. There are also 3 village shops, the Premier contains a Butchers and the Spar has the villiage Post Office. We also have ‘The Hive’ a cooperative business where you can have a cup of tea, buy antiques, arts and crafts, 2 hairdressers and a petrol station on the village outskirt. Busses link the village to both Looe and Polperro. Plymouth and Truro are also accessible by bus on various days. The Spar will deliver to your cottage if emailed in advance.

Well visitors here is where I could easily write a book! There is so much to see, hear, do and feel.

Looe

Historic and beautiful fishing village, still an active harbour. You can see fish landed and buy it from The Catch, we challenge you to find fresher, more delicious (Award winning!) Fish & Chips. Pengellys fish market will sell you the fruits of the sea to bring back here and cook up (or even better; fresh fish sold in our village Pelynt every friday)-  maybe with some local cream and white wine? Quayside Fresh with its local produce, and milk you can pump by the bottle. A sandy beach to soak up the sun, clear water to swim in or kayaks to hire. 

Fabulous independent galleries like The Old Lifeboat Gallery, tea shops, enough pasty shops to try a different pasty each day (we recommend Sarah’s Pasty Shop). Sandy beach and clear water, ice-cream, (is it to specific a recommendation to say Rum and Raisin is the best?), history, views, walks as well as Dr surgery, chemists etc.

Here you can catch a boat captain, lace their hands with gold and they will take you out to sea in a glass bottomed boat, you can expect to see Sea lions, occasionally Dolphins and we keep hearing stories of mermaids….but they may just be the local ladies who love cold water swimming in January.

Very often we take the water taxi from West Looe, across the harbour mouth into East Looe. Just because it’s fun really.

Polperro

A real treasure, Polperro is a must visit location. Those with sturdy boots can follow the lanes and walk to Polperro from Cardwen Farm, or a couple of minutes in the car will reward you with the definitive Cornish Fishing Village. Steeped in history, you wind your way slowly alongside the river past the pubs and independent shops and galleries to the protected harbour to gaze out at an azure sea splashing against cliffs that could tell you tales of smugglers and ship wrecks.

A favourite spot of our family to hunt for sea glass, pop your finds into the Wellydog shop and discover if your sea glass has the properties to glow in UV light!

Once laden down with fish cooked as it should be for starters, a pasty for main and a cream tea to follow, swigged down with local cider or gin you may appreciate the tram service that will take you back out of the harbour and return you to your car, stopping off for a postcard and another fresh baked pasty for the journey home at The Crumplehorn Shop next to the carpark.

Once laden down with fish cooked as it should be for starters, a pasty for main and a cream tea to follow, swigged down with local cider or gin you may appreciate the tram service that will take you back out of the harbour and return you to your car, stopping off for a postcard and another fresh baked pasty for the journey home at The Crumplehorn Shop next to the carpark.

Talland Bay

Here is our closest beach, and a location oft missed by visitors. A little local gem it is often a little quieter than nearby Looe and Polperro. Served by two fantastic cafes, this is the first place we went when we had our offer to buy Cardwen Farm accepted. Sat in a beach hut sipping something delicious in the sun watching blue waves break rhythmically on a bare beach we realised we had somehow landed paradise.  Do try the Talland Bay hotel for some finer dining with jaw dropping views.

Lansallos

Another lesser known beach with National Trust carpark. A great destination of you want to find a spot far from the madding crowd. Follow the track past the picture-perfect Church to the beach and another great launch point onto the South West Coast Path. We have frequently seen Seals here, if you do be quiet around them as they can throw themselves off rocks in fright at low tide and hurt themselves.

Lantic Bay

Another National Trust location (we have ever so many near here, you could spend a week just with the National Trust) you can park securely at the top of the cliff and be prepared to be amazed. Lantic Bay is, in the words of one of our visitors, “Better than Barbados. I won’t be getting on a plane again”. Whilst the descent and ascent out of the bay will burn off a pasty down and a cream tea up – it is just so very worth it. Part of the South West Coast Path, the views from the top of the cliff, across NT meadowland out to see are truly breath taking.

It is hard to find sufficient superlatives out of a keyboard, you need to experience this in your lifetime. For those who take on the path to the beach it is akin to stepping through the wardrobe (albeit a steep one) to Narnia. The first time we went there, it was hard to understand we were still in ol’ Blighty. A natural harbour, in the summer this is a favourite spot for swimming and for yachts to anchor up.

Bodmin Moor

Another of our AONB (Area of natural beauty) I find it hard not to call out “Heathcliff! It’s me; Cathy!”. Yes it’s technically the wrong moor, but I still find it amusing. The moor includes Brown Willy the highest point in Cornwall and Rough Tor a slightly smaller peak. The last time I went up there were also a free roaming herd of cows that are totally black with a large white stripe that circles their middle completely so when they stand in a line on a misty day you could be forgiven for thinking you have stumbled upon a zebra crossing. Colliford Lake is very surprising 900 acres and the source of many Cornish rivers.

Especially surprising if, like me, you were only expecting to see granite and gorse bushes not the biggest lake this side of the Lake District. (Probably!). For lunch on the moors Jamaica Inn is a Cornish classic bucket list item, you could not find an Inn more steeped in lore and history. On the way back off the moor Carnglaze Caverns is a little-known destination worth a visit. If it’s dark when you exit the caverns head back up to the moor and enjoy the vast sky unspoilt by darkness. (It is a designated International Dark Sky Landscape).

Golitha Falls

Don’t miss this nature lovers, a nature reserve with a maze of rivers and cascading waterfalls in a lovely woodland setting with its own car park and the highly recommended Inkies Smoke House. Another not so well known destination that recently featured on Rick Stein’s Cornwall programme. The internet is full of lovely photos with a slow shutter speed so the water looks like magical mist… You will need all these walking destinations to burn off the marvellous fresh food Cornwall is full of. To get to Golitha Falls you are going to pass near Minions. Yes, Minions, and yes; you may see some little yellow Minions too.

Fowey

Pronounced Foy, not Fo-wee, here is a destination that is quintessential Cornish holi-bobs. Accessible by car via the Boddinik Ferry or by parking at the top of Polruan and taking the pedestrian ferry in to the centre of Fowey. A favourite event is the Daphne Du Maurier Festival in May and Regatta week in August. The best ice cream to be found for miles (arduous research has led to this decision) is from the Game of Cones ice cream parlour by the car ferry carpark. Stock up on your rum and raisin and walk along the harbour side into the beating heart of Fowey. Keep some room to try the best of locally grown and sourced produce at the North Street Kitchen – recommended by Rick Stein.

The to-do list should include hiring a boat and put-put-putting back up stream to Lerryn…

Once laden down with fish cooked as it should be for starters, a pasty for main and a cream tea to follow, swigged down with local cider or gin you may appreciate the tram service that will take you back out of the harbour and return you to your car, stopping off for a postcard and another fresh baked pasty for the journey home at The Crumplehorn Shop next to the carpark.

Lerryn

Another hidden gem you would only find if a local tipped you off (so shhhh! Keep it to yourself) Lerryn is the location said locally to of inspired Kenneth Grahame’s classic children’s tale Wind in the Willows. Centred around a beautiful tidal river, you can top up the ice cream from the village shop; I would actually say that Lemon Curd is the best flavour – I hope dear reader you appreciate the work gone into this guide – and wonder along the bank into the woods where you may discover the remains of a Victorian pleasure park!

Once the ice cream is a mere cone, turn around and stop off in the pub for the best calamari, then post luncheon cross the river using the hexagon stepping stones at low tide or use the picture-perfect stone arch bridge. Follow the gravel path through chocolate box cottages along the river’s edge to Ethy Wood. Here a fabulous wooded walk follows the line of the estuary.  (The iWalkCornwall app has a circular walk from Lerryn to St Winnow). 

Once the ice cream is a mere cone, turn around and stop off in the pub for the best calamari, then post luncheon cross the river using the hexagon stepping stones at low tide or use the picture-perfect stone arch bridge. Follow the gravel path through chocolate box cottages along the river’s edge to Ethy Wood. Here a fabulous wooded walk follows the line of the estuary.  (The iWalkCornwall app has a circular walk from Lerryn to St Winnow). 

There are several walks from here, you may take an easy stroll absorbing the calming riverside wildlife, or follow a signed circular route taking you to the top of the woods. You can continue there into Forestry Commission owned woods or if you had your porridge for breakfast perhaps you could continue to St Winnow (2 miles) or even Lostwithiel (4.5 miles). 

At the top of the woods you may access a footpath which crosses past the Georgian Ethy House (perhaps the inspiration for Toad Hall) where occasionally the gardens are open to the public. For you Poldark fans, St Winnow was the location used for the wedding of Dwight Enys and Caroline Penvenen, Braddock Church held the nuptials of Drake & Morwenna.

Lostwithiel

Continuing the Poldark thread, the bulk of the original series (yes Millennials the series is in its second iteration) was filmed in and around Lostwithiel. More recently Sir Tim Smit (founder of the Eden Project and Lost Gardens of Heligan) has set his sights on another ground breaking project to build a one of a kind (in the world) orchard encompassing rare trees and plants, with visitor centre, cookery school and farmers market. I can’t wait, and am rather hoping he may come and discover a rare tree in our orchard? For golfers, Tim is building his orchard on half of a golf course, but will keep 9 holes for you to play with don’t worry! (9 holes are enough for me; it takes me so long I’ve probably shot the equivalent of 2 18 hole rounds anyway).

Lostwithiel is home to a great collection of antique and interior design shops, so keep some boot space free. Restormel Castle is a great couple of hours, and introduces you to the old capital seat of Cornwall! For lunch try The Duchy Nursery, and bring home a plant or 3 as a memento of your time in Cornwall. (I said you will need boot space!).

Par sands beach is a great yomp for the dogs, and around the corner the much less visited sandy beaches of Polkerris and Menabilly. Both locations once home to the renowned author Daphne du Maurier.

St Austell, Charlestown & Mevagissey

Here we have some of the tourism big hitters! Eden Project of course, my personal favourite The Lost Gardens of Heligan; restored sub-tropical gardens, art installations, animals, shops, restaurants, café. Charlestown is another wondrous Cornish gem- a village and port where a magnificent historic sailing ship is docked. A Poldark location from the most recent series also. A must see, with a beach and some great restaurants. The Pinetum gardens are lovely, as are Tregrehan Gardens.

Mevagissey is a picture-perfect working harbour, another great Rum and Raisin location. Highly recommend the Sharksfin restaurant on the quayside – the perfect combination of great food, stylish friendly restaurant and perfect views. Check out the unique light fittings…

For Cyclists, Walkers and Paddlers the locations and routes are endless. Cardwen Farm is a great base to explore from, be it inland, to the moors, the famous Camel Trail, or along estuaries and out to sea. There is a new location to explore for every day that you are here. I haven’t personally paddled, cycled and walked them all yet. Two years in and I still have trails and tributaries to explore….

Our Cottages

Erin Cottage

A semi-detached barn conversion this cottage has bags of charm with vaulted ceilings and stone walls. Redecorated in 2020 this fresh and stylish cottage has an open plan living area.

Sleeps: 4Bedrooms: 2

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Lily Cottage

A semi-detached barn conversion this delightful stone walled cottage has a very large open plan living space with 3 large sofas facing a lovely woodburning stove and smart TV – with our OWL TV.

Sleeps: 6Bedrooms: 3

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Hook Cottage

Our converted barn features vaulted ceilings in the master bedroom and King bed with an open plan living space. Renovated in 2019, curl up in front of the Woodburner and smart TV.

Sleeps: 4Bedrooms: 2

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Cardwen Farmhouse

Grade II Listed Georgian fronted Cardwen Farmhouse dates back to the 17th Century and could not have more character. Covered in picture perfect Wisteria, you will find stylish and comfortable charm.

Sleeps: 8Bedrooms: 4

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